Science center kiosks teach users about ocean conservation

March 20, 2015 | by Bradley Cooper

The ocean has made life possible on this planet, yet humanity has shown its gratitude by choking it with vast amounts of pollutants. Faced with this reality, the U.S. government has established several National Marine Sanctuaries both for education and conservation.

These sanctuaries are under the authority of the National Ocean & Atmospheric Administration who educate the public on the importance of conservation. The NOAA has partnered with kiosk manufacturer Meridianto install educational kiosks to aid them in this task.

"Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary is now featured at Seattle’s Pacific Science Center with a newly installed NOAA National Marine Sanctuary Interactive Touch Screen Kiosk," Amy Cale-Huebner, kiosk liaison for NOAA said. "The kiosk offers a high-impact visual and auditory showcase of all the treasures the sanctuary has to offer."

This is the latest of the Pacific Science Center's exhibits that have been installed by NOAA. One of these exhibits is called the Sound Atmosphere. According to the Science Center's website, "Scientists from the NOAA have installed a device that measures the amount of CO² in the atmosphere around the Seattle Center region and this real time data is streamed right to our monitoring station. Visitors can see how levels of CO² change from morning to evening, from spring to winter and from weekdays to weekends."

The Meridian kiosks at the Pacific Science Center serve as educational tools for users to understand what services and programs the sanctuaries offer. "With the click of a button, users learn about the various activities of the sanctuary; educational and outreach programs, research projects and resource protection programs as well as extensive information about species, habitats, history and culture," Cale-Huebner said. "Visitors can also use the kiosk for up-to-the-minute reports on weather and ocean conditions."

According to NOAA's website they have established 14 protected sanctuaries all around the coastline of the United States. "Our national marine sanctuaries are places of inspiration. Within their waters and along their shores, you can find vibrant tapestries of marine life, ancient mysteries of our past, and thriving communities of men and women who have relied on the sea for generations."

One of the sanctuaries' programs is called "Earth is Blue." The point of this campaign is to showcase the beauty of the ocean and its wildlife. According to their website, "We will be sharing a photo each day and a video each week highlighting the wonder and beauty of these special places and the work we do to protect them." Essentially, if citizens are able to tie specific images to their notion of the ocean, they will be more willing to protect the ocean.

In addition, the sanctuaries also provide condition reports from their various sanctuaries on the current environmental factors that are affecting the wildlife and ocean health. According to NOAA's website, they evaluate its health based on four categories: water, habitat, living resources and marine archaeology. For example, on the section on the Olympic Marine Sanctuary, the report notes that over fishing has caused extensive damage to the ecosystem of the area.

Travelers can learn more by visiting the Seattle's Pacific Science Center and checking out the NOAA kiosks. If travelers wish to visit the Olympic Marine Sanctuary, they can start at the Olympic Coast Discovery Center, and from there they can utilize a tour guide to take them around all the best sites of the sanctuary's 3,300-square-mile area. 


Topics: Government, Interactive / Touchscreen, Manufacturers, Tourism & Travel

Companies: Meridian



Bradley Cooper
Bradley Cooper is a Technology Editor for DigitalSignageToday.com. His background is in information technology, advertising, and writing. wwwView Bradley Cooper's profile on LinkedIn

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